Some facts about milk thistle

Milk thistle has been used for over 2 000 years as an herbal remedy for a variety of ailments.

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is related to the artichoke. The herbal medicine comes from the plant’s seeds. It is available in capsules, as an alcohol tincture, or as a glycerite (concentrated in glycerine). The main biochemical ingredient is a group of compounds called silymarin. Milk thistle gets its name from the milky sap that comes out of the leaves when they are broken. The leaves have prominent white markings that, according to legend, were the Virgin Mary’s milk. Milk thistle should not be confused with blessed thistle (Cnicus benedictus). Milk thistle leaves and flowers can be eaten in salads and as a substitute for spinach. The seeds are roasted for use as a coffee substitute.

WHAT IS MILK THISTLE USED FOR?

Milk thistle is commonly used in the following ways:

  • To help the liver work better in people with inflammatory, infectious and degenerative liver problems
  • As supportive therapy for asthma
  • For degenerative disorders of the blood vessels, varicose veins and haemorrhoids
  • Silymarin can protect against carcinogens such as ultraviolet B radiation.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE-EFFECTS?

Side-effects are rare, but may include:

  • Diarrhoea or an upset stomach, especially for the first few days
  • Decreased blood sugar in diabetics.

Don’t take milk thistle if you are allergic to chrysanthemums, marigolds, chamomile, yarrow or daisies.

WILL MILK THISTLE INTERFERE WITH MY OTHER MEDICATIONS OR MY MEDICAL CONDITION?

If you are being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use milk thistle without first talking to your health care provider:

  • Antipsychotics – including butyrophenones (such as haloperidol) and phenothiazines

(such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine and promethazine)

  • Phenytoin (Epanutin) – a medication used for seizures
  • Halothane – used for general anaesthesia
  • Birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy.

Milk thistle may interfere with the following medications, because both milk thistle and

these medications are broken down by the same liver enzymes:

  • Allergy drugs such as fexofenadine (Telfast)
  • Drugs for high cholesterol, including statins such as lovastatin
  • Anti-anxiety drugs, including alprazolam (Xanor), diazepam (Valium) and lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs (blood thinners), including clopidogrel (Plavix) and warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Some cancer drugs
  • Drugs broken down by the liver. Because milk thistle works on the liver, it may affect drugs broken down by the liver, of which there are many. Speak to your health care provider.

IS IT SAFE FOR CHILDREN AND PREGNANT WOMEN?

There are no studies of milk thistle’s use for children or women who are pregnant or breast-feeding. No problems have been reported.

WHAT ARE TYPICAL DOSAGES?

  • A typical adult dose of milk thistle extract is 100 – 200 mg, three times a day by mouth.
  • Doses for children are unknown.
  • Standardised extracts of milk thistle are available. They are guaranteed to contain a certain amount of active ingredients. Usually these products contain 70 – 80% silymarin.

Most studies of milk thistle’s effectiveness have used a specific extract standardized to 70 – 80% silymarin.

WHAT’S ON SOUTH AFRICAN SHELVES?

  • Iberogast – milk thistle tincture with peppermint leaf, German chamomile, caraway, liquorice, clown’s mustard plant, celandine, angelica and lemon balm
  • Phyto Force – milk thistle herbal tincture
  • Master Health Products – Milk Thistle Plus (milk thistle, rosemary and Schisandra sphenanthera) capsules
  • Solgar – milk thistle-dandelion complex in capsule form (phosphatidylcholine, dandelion, milk thistle, schisandra extract, plus more)
  • Vital – Liver Rescue (milk thistle, artichoke extract, amino acids and B vitamins)
  • Formula Naturelle – milk thistle (with dandelion, artichoke, beetroot and motherwort)
  • Holistix – milk thistle extract in capsule forms formulated from milk thistle seeds.

Sources

  1. Andey Amata-Kynvi, RN, BSN. Longwood Herbal Task Force. http://www.mcp.edu/herbal/default.htm
  2. http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/milk-thistle-000266.html

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Some facts about milk thistle

Daleen Totten
About The Author
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As editor, publisher and founding member of Natural Medicine® Magazine, Daleen believes that natural medicine is more than taking a pill for an ill philosophy. It also encompasses nutrition, lifestyle, spiritual health, exercise, and emotional and mental well-being. She is an entrepreneur and director of various companies including Natural Medicine® World, Natural Medicine® Market, Dreamcatcher Publications, Dreamcatcher Trade and AromAfrique. She has a passion for knowledge and strives to share the work of the brightest minds and biggest hearts in healing. She is the mother of three children.