NEWS AND NOTES APRIL

    INDOOR PLANTS CAN PURIFY THE AIR

    INDOOR PLANTS CAN PURIFY THE AIR

    Variegated snake plant/ mother-in-law’s tongue (Sansevieria trifasciata) is a good plant to grow in your house and office for air purification. It can help get rid of formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide and benzene, as well as help to lower carbon dioxide levels.

    This wonderfully unusual-looking plant can thrive without much light or water. It generally prefers drier conditions and some sunlight, so be careful not to water it too much, especially during wet or cold seasons. It gives a slight oxygen boost at night so it can be useful in a bedroom, and you can even keep this plant in a bathroom or any other empty space in your house or office.

    A MESSAGE FROM JAPAN TO THE WORLD

    A message from Japan

    Prof Masayasu Inoue, Professor Emeritus of Osaka City University Medical School just released a statement to the world on video: ‘The pandemic was used as a false pretext by the WHO to drive vaccinations of all peoples in the world.' He says the fraudulent use of ‘experimental gene therapy to healthy people' was not only an ‘extreme violation of human rights,' but ‘the result was the induction of the terrible drug-induced injury that has never [been] seen in human history.' He warns agains any vaccine coming out of Japan for the use against viruses such as Disease X. These new self-amplifying mRNA shot (ARCT-154), as the name implies, contains the equipment needed to make more of itself once it enters cells.

     SALT SOCKS FOR EARACHE

    Contrary to popular belief, antibiotics are not the answer for the majority of children with earache. According to the New York Times, as many as ‘80 to 90% of all children with uncomplicated ear infections recover within a week without antibiotics.’ This is because most earache infections are viral and not bacterial.

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a wait-and-see approach: If over 48 hours the symptoms in children between six months and two years, with an infection in one ear, do not worsen, lay off the antibiotics. The same applies for older children with a mild infection in one or both ears.

    To ease the discomfort, try a soothing salt sock:

    Use

    • 1 clean, long, cotton sock
    • 1 to 11⁄2 cups coarse sea salt
    • A few drops of lavender or tea tree essential oil (optional)

    SOIL Lavender

    Instructions

    Pour salt in the sock and tie the ankle section in a knot. Heat the sock in a clean, thick-bottomed pan over a low heat. Turn the sock often to ensure even heating. When it is very warm (but not uncomfortably hot), apply a couple of drops of essential oil directly on the sock if desired. Place the warmed sock on the ear and allow it to sit there for as long as you wish. Repeat the process if needed.

    Source

    Mommypotamus.com

    EAT FERMENTED DAILY 

    To reap the rewards of fermented foods, it's crucial to incorporate them into your daily diet in a way that suits your preferences and meal schedule. Whether it's enjoying yogurt with breakfast, sauerkraut with lunch, or kefir as a midday snack, spreading out consumption throughout the day can minimize gastric discomfort. Brine, the salty liquid surrounding fermented foods like sauerkraut, contains active live cultures. Incorporating brine into your fermented food intake can provide additional benefits for gut health. Fermented foods increase microbiome diversity and reduced inflammation. With careful selection and consistent consumption, fermented foods offer a delicious and effective approach to supporting our body's natural systems.

    THE SUGAR-ALZHEIMER’S LINK

    Research shows that excess glucose damages a key enzyme involved with inflammation in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Alzheimer’s disease is caused by the build-up of abnormal proteins that cause plaques and tangles in the brain. This damages the brain and leads to severe cognitive impairment. Glucose and its break-down products can damage proteins in cells via a reaction called glycation. Researchers from the University of Bath and King’s College London have now as- certained that in the early stages of Alzheimer’s glycation damages an enzyme called MIF that plays a role in immune response and insulin regulation.

    Professor Jean van den Elsen from the University of Bath says, ‘Normally MIF would be part of the immune response to the build-up of abnormal proteins in the brain, and we think that because sugar damage reduces some MIF functions and completely inhibits others that this could be a tipping point that allows Alzheimer’s to develop.’

    Source

    University of Bath

    EYE DROPS FOR NEWBORNS OUTDATED

    Prophylactic antibiotic eye drops administered to newborns should stop, says midwife Liza van de Hoef: ‘The research shows this practice is ineffective, outdated and unethical.’

    The practice began 120 years ago when silver nitrate drops were used to lower the incidence of blindness in newborns of mothers with chlamydia or gonorrhoea.

    Modern-day effective screening of expectant mums for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is available and if the infant is infected there are better treatment options as certain gonorrhoea strains, for example, are now resistant to antibiotics.

    ‘It would be more effective to screen all pregnant women for gonorrhea and chlamydia infection and treat and follow-up those found to be infected,’ said Dr Dorothy Moore, an infectious diseases specialist at the Montreal Children’s Hospital.

    CREATIVITY LINKED TO BETTER BRAINS

    CREATIVITY LINKED TO BETTER BRAINS

    A study suggests that creativity depends on how well the two brain hemispheres communicate.

    Statisticians David Dunson of Duke University and Daniele Durante of the University of Padova analysed the network of white matter connections among 68 separate brain regions in healthy college-age volunteers.

    The brain’s white matter lies underneath the outer grey matter and is composed of bundles of wires (axons) that connect billions of neurons and carry electrical signals between them. Scientists led by neuroscientist Rex Jung of the University of New Mexico collected the data that were analysed using an MRI technique that allows researchers to look through the skull and trace the paths of all the axons.

    Findings showed that highly creative people have significantly more white matter connections between the right and left hemispheres of the brain.

    Sources

    University of Padova Duke University University of New Mexico

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